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Kirk Penney - SG, 6'5, 220
Signed in Australia/New Zealand - Signed with New Zealand Breakers
       Date of birth: 11/23/1980
       Country: New Zealand
     Drafted (NBA): Undrafted, 2003
     Out of: Wisconsin
  NBA Experience: 2 years
  Hand: Right

Kirk Penney can really, really, really, really shoot the ball.





As I said. Kirk Penney can really, really, really, really shoot the ball.

From blog:


   .....Third Prize Is You're Fired
2010-10-06

Penney has played in the NBA before, but it was a long time ago now. Between 2003 and 2005, he spent time with the Timberwolves, Heat and Clippers, compiling 29 minutes of court time. Since then, the New Zealand international spent a couple of seasons in the upper echelons of the European game, before returning home (kind of) in 2007 to play for the New Zealand Breakers (who, despite the name and the location, play in the Australian league). Penney has absolutely destroyed the NBL since he went there, leading the league in scoring for the last two seasons, and averaging 23.2 points and 5.2 rebounds last season. He came back to America at the tail end of the season to join the D-League's Sioux Falls Skyforce, where he scored 22.7 more points per game, before averaging a further 24.7ppg for New Zealand in this summer's world championships. Penney was always good at Wisconsin, but now he's even better, a terrific jumpshooter with enough size and speed, who's also dragged his defense up to acceptable levels. He may not have been in the NBA for a while, but that doesn't mean he couldn't have been.

[read full post]


Signed in Australia


 
 
 


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Note: Non-US teams that the player has played for are, unless stated otherwise, from the top division in that nation. If a league or division name is expressly stated, it's not the top division. The only exceptions to this are the rare occasions where no one league is said to be above the other, such as with the JBL/BJ League split in Japan.


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