"Last year it was Abe Pollin's widow and this year it was a 14-year-old boy and the only thing we have in common is we have both been bar mitzvahed. We were done." - David Kahn on why he didn't win the lottery

 
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  -  Jordan Hamilton - SG/SF, 6'7, 220
Reno Bighorns - In the D-League player pool
       Date of birth: 10/06/1990
       Country: USA
     Drafted (NBA): 26th pick, 2011
     Out of: Texas
  NBA Experience: 3 years
  Hand: Right

When: Where:
2009 - 2011 Texas (NCAA)
June 2011 - February 2014 Denver Nuggets (NBA)
February 2014 - June 2014 Houston Rockets (NBA)
August 2014 - October 2014 Toronto Raptors (NBA)
October 2014 - November 2014 Utah Jazz (NBA)
November 2014 - December 2014 Iowa Energy (D-League)
December 2014 - present Reno Bighorns (D-League)


Date
League
Transaction
2011 NBA Draft NBA Drafted 26th overall by Dallas.
2011 NBA Draft NBA As a part of a three team trade, draft rights traded to Denver (along with the draft rights to Targuy Ngombo (#57) to Portland) in exchange for Rudy Fernandez and the draft rights to Petteri Koponen (#30, 2007) from Portland.
9th December, 2011 NBA Signed four year, $5,473,974 rookie scale contract with Denver. Included team options for 2013/14 and 2014/15.
22nd October, 2012 NBA Denver exercised 2013/14 team option.
30th October, 2013 NBA Denver declined 2014/15 team option.
20th February, 2014 NBA Traded by Denver to Houston in exchange for Aaron Brooks.
15th August, 2014 NBA Signed a partially guaranteed one year minimum salary contract with Toronto.
25th October, 2014 NBA Waived by Toronto.
27th October, 2014 NBA Claimed off waivers by Utah.
6th November, 2014 NBA Waived by Utah.
27th November, 2014 D-League Acquired by Iowa Energy.
11th December, 2014 D-League Traded by Iowa Energy, along with a 2015 second round pick, to Reno Bighorns in exchange for a 2015 first round pick.


From blog:


   2011 NBA Draft Diary
2011-06-25

Pick 26: One guy falls a long way every year, and this year it was Jordan Hamilton, whose slump is getting Rashard Lewis-esque here. It finally ends, however, when he is picked by Dallas at #26.

Dallas just won the NBA championship, and they did it without Rodrigue Beaubois (injured, then DNP-CD) or Caron Butler (out for the year) playing in the second half of the season. They had enough depth even without those two players, who, conceivably, would be a pretty strong starting wing rotation in their own right. And now they've added to that depth with both Corey Brewer and Jordan Hamilton. Hamilton is a lottery talent that should never have fallen this far. With no buyout or injury issue, it's bizarre why he did. He's somewhat selfish on the court, but not THAT selfish. Dallas gets a steal.

.....At least, they briefly get a steal. The Mavericks later make an entirely unexpected deal - they wriggle their way into the aforementioned Blazers/Nuggets deal, and trade Hamilton's draft rights to Portland [edit: Denver], in exchange for Rudy Fernandez and the draft rights to Petteri Koponen.

[read full post]

   Sham's unnecessarily great big draft board: Small Forwards
2011-06-23

Jordan Hamilton - In his first year as a Longhorn, Jordan Hamilton was the most selfish player ever. He looked to shoot every time he touched it, and I do mean every time. On the rare occasions that a team mate was allowed to shoot, you could actually see Hamilton in the background pretending to shoot, so desperate was he to get another shot up despite not having the ball. It was ugly.

Last season, Hamilton was still somewhat selfish. But relative to what he was, he is 900% less selfish than he was. And Jordan Hamilton is the kind of player you want to have shooting a lot, for he is a fine shotmaker, with 27 feet of range and the ability to hit almost anything, even when contested. He shouldn't be doing that a lot of the time, of course, but it's good to know that he can. Furthermore, on the rare occasions that he passes, Hamilton demonstrates good vision, a good sense of awareness, and an always conscious effort to get open. He dribbles into traffic at times, can lose the handle, and doesn't shoot especially well off of more than one dribble yet, but his ability to hit pretty much anything can bail him out, even when it shouldn't. His defense is considerably less impressive, but at nearly 6'9 in shoes with his athleticism, there's great potential on that end if someone can make him buy in.

A comparison to a bigger Ricky Davis with more range may leave a sour taste, but it needn't. I'd prefer a Rudy Gay comparison, too, but Ricky Buckets would be fine. Failing that, J.R. Smith.

[read full post]


Santa Cruz Warriors







Note: Non-US teams that the player has played for are, unless stated otherwise, from the top division in that nation. If a league or division name is expressly stated, it's not the top division. The only exceptions to this are the rare occasions where no one league is said to be above the other, such as with the JBL/BJ League split in Japan.


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