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Jason Calliste - PG/SG, 6'2, 171
Signed in North American minor leagues - Signed with Kitchener-Waterloo Titans in NBL Canada
       Date of birth: 01/27/1990
       Country: Canada/Jamaica
     Drafted (NBA): Undrafted, 2014
     Out of: Oregon
  NBA Experience: 0 years
  Hand: Right

Date
League
Transaction
30th October, 2014 D-League Designated as a local tryout player by Maine Red Claws.
3rd November, 2015 Latvia Signed a one year contract with Barons Riga.
31st October, 2016 D-League Designated as a returning player by Maine Red Claws.
28th January, 2017 D-League Waived by Maine Red Claws.
8th February, 2017 NBL Canada Signed for the remainder of the season with Kitchener-Waterloo Titans.
When: Where:
2009 - 2013 Detroit (NCAA)
2013 - 2014 Oregon (NCAA)
October 2014 - June 2015 Maine Red Claws (D-League)
November 2015 - June 2016 Barons Riga (Latvia)
October 2016 - January 2017 Maine Red Claws (D-League)
February 2017 Kitchener-Waterloo Titans (NBL Canada)
From blog:


   Wildly Unnecessarily Lengthy 2014 NBA Draft Board, Part 2: NCAA Shooting Guards
2014-06-17

Against Dwyane Wade, this would be a foul on number 20.

Jason Calliste, Oregon, Senior, 6'2 171lbs

2013/14 stats: 26.5 mpg, 12.7 ppg, 2.1 rpg, 1.7 apg, 1.1 spg, 0.1 bpg, 2.1 fpg, 1.5 TOpg, 52.8% FG, 50.4% 3PT, 87.3% FT

Calliste played three years at Detroit, then left when Ray McCallum did. In those three years, he was a good if temperamental scorer, but with the Ducks, Calliste was RIDICULOUS. So much so that I used capital letters to convey it when stats might be better.

His efficiency last season was simply staggering. The percentages are self-evidently impressive, but they become more so when the amount of each shot is taking into account. Calliste took only 6.4 shots per game, 3.8 of which were from three point range, alongside 4.8 foul shots a contest. His 12.7 points per game, then, is basically 2 points per shot, almost unheard or, especially from a tiny guard. It equates to a 74% true shooting percentage, which is just ridiculous.

It is, of course, an outlier until further notice. Calliste shot between 34% and 39% from three point range in the three previous seasons, which is good but not this. Nevertheless, it speaks to Calliste's effectiveness as an off-ball role player. A point guard's size, Calliste cannot play the position for anything more than spot possessions, yet he is not overly hindered by size. He does find it difficult to finish around the basket on forays to the rim, but he attacks the contact and will readily take the two foul shots instead (on which he unashamedly stole Gilbert Arenas's routine). Similarly, while size could be a hindrance defensively, he plays hard and competes on that end, and has decent hands. Calliste shoots with confidence at any halfway decent opportunity, is fast if not lightning, shoots a step-back and will attack the rim even if he's too small to do much at it.

There's a lot to like about Calliste. Size and age (he is already 24) count slightly against him, but he has improved consistently in his four collegiate seasons and is very effective in his role. He is an excellent catch-and-shoot player who can attack off the closeouts, who sells fakes well, runs off the ball, uses his body and speed well, and to a small degree can create for others with solid passing vision and discipline (especially with drop-off passes off the dribble). He scores in bursts, has good hands, and is generally pretty excellent at the few things he does. At the right level, it's a very effective package.

That level is probably Italy.

[read full post]


Signed in Minor Leagues


 
 
 


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Note: Non-US teams that the player has played for are, unless stated otherwise, from the top division in that nation. If a league or division name is expressly stated, it's not the top division. The only exceptions to this are the rare occasions where no one league is said to be above the other, such as with the JBL/BJ League split in Japan.


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