"When he has the ball in his hands, I'm a lot better coach." - Rick Adelman about Ricky Rubio



Back to Player Index     -     Click for a random player

 
Carson Desrosiers - C, 7'0, 250
Free agent - Last played with Kataja (Finland, 2016)
       Date of birth: 10/25/1991
       Country: USA
     Drafted (NBA): Undrafted, 2015
     Out of: Providence
  NBA Experience: 0 years
  Hand: Right

Date
League
Transaction
29th June, 2015 Finland Signed a one year contract with Kataja.
When: Where:
2010 - 2012 Wake Forest (NCAA)
2012 - 2015 Providence (NCAA)
June 2015 - June 2016 Kataja (Finland)
From blog:


   Wildly Unnecessarily Lengthy 2015 NBA Draft Board, Part 4: NCAA Centres
2015-06-18

Carson Desrosiers

On the face of it, Desrosiers never improved in his five seasons in division one basketball. Averages of 4.0 points, 3.2 rebounds and 1.7 blocks in 19.1 minutes per game as a freshman at Wake Forest, compared to 6.7 points, 4.4 rebounds and 2.5 blocks in 25.1 minutes per game as a senior at Providence, suggest mere minimal improvements. There were some improvements to be found in his efficiency - 39.1% field goal shooting and .456% true shooting percentage as a freshman, 44.9% and .529% respectively as a senior - but Desrosiers has never been known for scoring efficiency. Clearly. Yet there are developments to be seen, particularly on defense.

Desrosiers is a consistent defensive presence, a shotblocker and paint protector, with tremendous timing on his shot blocks and a good deal more shots either altered or declined through his deterrent presence. Without being especially strong (especially in the upper body) or athletic, Desrosiers's seven foot size and decent mobility, plus his eternal desire to block shots, can have a significant impact on the game defensively in ways not easily measured. Desrosiers doesn't make down from physical challenges in the paint, even when overmatched, and he exhibits good footwork in his post defense. He is less sure on the perimeter and when defending pick-and-roll action, but around the paint, he has tremendous instincts.

Offensively, Desrosiers remains limited. He has a bit of a foul line jumpshot - not efficient, but not a player you can entirely leave alone - yet this is undermined by his scoring at the basket, where he is one of the worst seven-foot finishers around. Desrosiers shies away from contact, has very little in the way of ability to create one on one (outside of a fallway jump shot, perhaps), and rarely tries to make himself a target for a catch or a feed. For all the defensive instincts he has, Desrosiers sorely lacks in offensive ones.

He does have some use away from the basket, though, a willing screener with occasional roll/pop action, and a decent high-post passing vision that can be used in high/low, handoff or give-and-go sets. Providence used his perimeter passing and occasional jump shot threat to open up cutting lanes for guards, something he can be more effective on with more consistent touch from outside and a few more feet of range. But the scoring talent in general is minimal. Desrosiers is not confident, aggressive or in any way smooth on offense, makes little effort to get position or open, cannot take the contact he can himself give on defense, and is often one to hide.

However, this is a seven footer who really can be something of a defensive wall. The offensive flaws are fine; at least he is unselfish and plays within his limits. Very rarely in the post he may be on offense, but very rarely out of it is he on defense, and he's a significant obstacle around the basket. Desrosiers has developed into a thoroughly useful player, and although he may be somewhat limited, he is good enough at what he does to better any team.

[read full post]


Free Agents


Players - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - Y - Z

Note: Non-US teams that the player has played for are, unless stated otherwise, from the top division in that nation. If a league or division name is expressly stated, it's not the top division. The only exceptions to this are the rare occasions where no one league is said to be above the other, such as with the JBL/BJ League split in Japan.


Follow this site on: