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Sergei Monia - SG/SF, 6'8, 220
Signed in Russia - Signed with Khimki
       Date of birth: 04/15/1983
       Country: Russia
     Drafted (NBA): 23rd pick, 2004
     Out of: CSKA Moscow (Russia)
  NBA Experience: 1 years
  Hand: Right

From blog:


   2010 Summer Signings, Part 4
2010-06-19

Not everyone is suffering, though. Khimki have taken advantage of the situation by signing ex-Blazers forward Sergei Monia from cash strapped rivals Dynamo Moscow, and have also signed ex-Nets guard Zoran Planinic from the other Moscow team, CSKA. CSKA can probably afford to spare Planinic; they have made 8 consecutive Euroleague Final Fours, and danced their way to a Russian Superleague title, going unbeaten throughout the postseason (beating Khimky in the final). It is not immediately official who the two replace in Khimky, but one of the team's Spanish national team point guards (Raul Lopez and Carlos Cabezas) figures to go, and it will probably be Cabezas.

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   Where Are They Now, 2010; Part 45
2010-04-09

- Sergei Monia

Former Blazers forward Sergei Monia is back home in Russia, and has been with Dynamo Moscow for four years. Even when Dynamo ran out of money over the summer, Monia stayed with the team, and is a key player in their new Russian-only regime. He is averaging 14.6 points, 8.1 rebounds, 1.3 steals and 1.4 blocks per game in the Superleague, alongside 12.8 points, 8.3 rebounds, 1.7 steals and 1.3 blocks per game in Dynamo's short and not especially sweet Eurocup campaign.

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Signed in Russia


 
 
 


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Note: Non-US teams that the player has played for are, unless stated otherwise, from the top division in that nation. If a league or division name is expressly stated, it's not the top division. The only exceptions to this are the rare occasions where no one league is said to be above the other, such as with the JBL/BJ League split in Japan.


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