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Paul Millsap - PF, 6'8, 246
Denver Nuggets - Signed as a free agent in July 2017
       Date of birth: 02/10/1985
       Country: USA
     Drafted (NBA): 47th pick, 2006
     Out of: Louisiana Tech
  NBA Experience: 11 years
  Hand: Right




Date
League
Transaction
2006 NBA Draft NBA Drafted 47th overall by Utah.
1st August, 2006 NBA Signed a three year, $2,110,037 contract with Utah. Included team option for 2008/09.
28th June, 2008 NBA Utah exercised 2008/09 team option.
10th July, 2009 NBA Signed a four year, $32 million offer sheet with Portland.
17th July, 2009 NBA Utah matches Portland's offer sheet.
10th July, 2013 NBA Signed a two year, $19 million contract with Atlanta.
9th July, 2015 NBA Re-signed by Atlanta to a three year, $60,216,099 contract. Included player option for 2017/18.
22nd May, 2017 NBA Declined 2017/18 player option.
13th July, 2017 NBA Signed a three year, $91.5 million contract with Denver. Included team option for 2019/20.
When: Where:
2003 - 2006 Louisiana Tech (NCAA)
June 2006 - June 2013 Utah Jazz (NBA)
July 2013 - June 2017 Atlanta Hawks (NBA)
July 2017 - present Denver Nuggets (NBA)
From blog:


   2017 NBA Manifesto
2017-06-29

Paul Millsap
PF, 6’8, 246lbs, 32 years old, 11 years of experience

Retooling rather than rebuilding and remaining competitive so as to avoid the doldrums will only have worked if Millsap is either retained, or if value is gained. Notwithstanding the declines in his games played, scor-ing efficiency (by more than the uptake in his three-point rate can justify) and rebounding rates, he would be worthy of a three year, $85 million contract given the circumstances. But it will surely cost more than that, especially in terms of the committed years. If he is retained, the trade must remain a possibility. Having lost Al Horford and DeMarre Carroll for nothing, Atlanta cannot easily afford it to happen again. But he is not an at-any-price player. If he is brought back at some price, the team must still get younger around him, retaining flexibility and a shred of competitiveness while still planning ahead.

Player Plan: Has declined a player option for $21,472,407 and thus heading to UFA. Would be eligible for a $200 million deal. Do not give him it. But do give him a lot. Re-signing him will almost certainly involve committing to a fourth year he will not sustain his performance for, but so be it.

[read full post]

   The NBA's middle class: where fringe stars now hang out
2013-10-18

These deals are less common, due in no small part by the shortening of the maximum contract lengths under the 2011 CBA, but also due to more conservative spending in general. The $19 million Paul Millsap received this year is further impressive when compared to the $37.5 million Rip Hamilton received five years ago in a very similar situation.

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   Ten Of The Best New Contracts This Offseason
2013-09-23

Paul Millsap – Atlanta Hawks

Millsap signed with Atlanta for two years at $9.5 million per year, a significant chunk of cap space for a team who have worked so diligently to cut as much payroll as possible. Reversing the direction of the franchise is initially tough to reconcile, yet it is worth it because of how good of value his deal represents.

Millsap is signed to an amount comparable to his talent, for a short period of time. His deal only being two years long is of big help to the Hawks, both on their court and potentially on other teams. He provides Atlanta with the talent boost that will keep them out of the cellar – if you want bums on seats, you need that – while this contract makes him extremely tradeable. Millsap is a valued commodity around the league as a quality, versatile, two-way role player, and by getting him at the right price, Atlanta put themselves in a position to take advantage of that. And as long as they do, he’ll help them significantly as a player.

Even rebuilding teams need that.

[read full post]

   How rebuilding can last forever in the NBA
2013-09-20

Deals are judged by the comparable ones of others, and the obvious and necessary comparison here is with Paul Millsap, Jefferson's running mate as recently as five months ago. Millsap signed with Atlanta for two thirds of what Jefferson did ($9.5 million annual compared to $13.5 million for Al), and for two thirds of the time (two years instead of three). Logically, this would suggest Millsap is two third of the player. But he's not. Without wanting or needing to fully compare the two, we can all hopefully concede that they are about the same, give or take. But the price is very different.

Millsap is signed to an amount comparable to his talent, for shorter time. He provides Atlanta with the talent boost that will keep them out of the cellar - if you want bums on seats, you need that - and his contract makes him extremely tradeable. Millsap is a valued commodity around the league as a quality, versatile, two-way role player, and by getting him at the right price, Atlanta put themselves in a position to take advantage of that. And until they do, he'll help them significantly as a player.

Charlotte, however have paid the 'Bobcats tax' and will suffer for it. Jefferson is, at best, at the very top end of the acceptable overpay range, and probably slightly beyond it. Yet it is that third year that makes it extremely difficult to trade him before the summer of 2015. Rebuilding teams need as much flexibility as possible - with his undervalued, very competitively priced skills and short contract, Millsap could be traded for a quality return as soon as February. Jefferson can't. He costs too much and he's under contract for too long to be highly prized. Indeed, he may not be tradeable at all. This is not all bad, as it will mean a quality player will stay with them for three years.

At some point, a rebuilding project needs to involve actual building. At some point, you need to start acquiring quality - you can't forgo all talent acquisition just to stay bad just to hopefully get lucky in a good draft class. Charlotte have reached that point. Atlanta have somewhat, too. But in these respective signings, the Hawks and Bobcats have put themselves in far different positions. One team landed a quality player on a great price who will help the team in both the immediate future and (via trade), likely the long term. Meanwhile, Charlotte spend $21.5 million more to achieve less.

It was the right idea, but not the right execution.

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